• Breaking News: President Erdogan deposed in coup!

    16/Jul/2016 // 1686 Viewers

     

    Turkish president Tayyip Erdoğan is reportedly seeking asylum in Europe, as a military coup continues in Turkey, U.S. military sources tell NBC News. 

    Erdoğan's presidential jet was allegedly denied landing rights at Istanbul's airport, before heading out of the country. He was then denied asylum in Germany, according to NBC, before heading to London.

    Addressing Turkey via Facetime, Erdoğan asserted declared, “I am president,” and vowed to crush the opposition forces. He also said "This country can't be managed from Pennsylvania," directly linking the coup attempt to U.S.-based exiled imam Fethullah Gülen.


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  • Breaking: 190 reportedly killed as Turkish coup fails

    16/Jul/2016 // 1115 Viewers

     

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Forces loyal to Turkey's president quashed a coup attempt in a night of explosions, air battles and gunfire that left at least 161 people dead and 1,440 wounded Saturday. Authorities arrested thousands as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed that those responsible "will pay a heavy price for their treason."

    The chaos came amid a period of political turmoil in Turkey — a NATO member and key Western ally in the fight against the Islamic State group — that critics blame on Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian rule. Staying in power by switching from being prime minister to president, Erdogan has shaken up the government, cracked down on dissidents, restricted the news media and renewed fighting with Kurdish rebels.

    The government has also come under pressure from the millions of refugees in Turkey who have fled violence in neighboring Syria and Iraq, and a series of bloody attacks in Turkey blamed on the Islamic State group and Kurdish rebels.

    Erdogan was on a seaside vacation when tanks rolled into the streets of Ankara and Istanbul. He flew home early Saturday and declared the coup to have failed.

    "They have pointed the people's guns against the people. The president, whom 52 percent of the people brought to power, is in charge. This government brought to power by the people is in charge," Erdogan told large crowds after landing at Istanbul's Ataturk Airport.

    The uprising appears not to have been backed by the most senior ranks of the military, and Turkey's main opposition parties quickly condemned the attempted overthrow of the government. Gen. Umit Dundar said the plotters were mainly officers from the Air Force, the military police and the armored units.

    Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said 161 people were killed and 1,440 wounded in the violence, and 2,839 plotters were detained. A source at the office of the presidency, speaking on condition of anonymity in line with government rules, said the toll of 161 "excludes assailants" — which could mean the death toll is much higher.

    Yildirim described the night as "a black mark on Turkish democracy" and said the perpetrators "will receive every punishment they deserve."

    Turkey's NATO allies lined up to condemn the coup. President Barack Obama urged all sides to support Turkey's democratically elected government. NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said he spoke to Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu and called for the Turkish people to respect democracy.

    There have long been tensions between the military — which saw itself as the protector of the secular Turkish state — and Erdogan's Islamic-influenced AKP party.

    Government officials blamed the coup attempt on a U.S.-based moderate Islamic cleric, Fethullah Gulen. Erdogan has often accused the cleric and his supporters of attempting to overthrow the government. Gulen lives in exile in Pennsylvania and promotes a philosophy that blends a mystical form of Islam with staunch advocacy of democracy, education, science and interfaith dialogue.

    Gulen, however, said he condemned "in the strongest terms, the attempted military coup in Turkey" and sharply rejected any responsibility for the attempted coup.

    "Government should be won through a process of free and fair elections, not force," he said. "I pray to God for Turkey, for Turkish citizens, and for all those currently in Turkey that this situation is resolved peacefully and quickly."

    "As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt. I categorically deny such accusations," he added.

    Still, the government pressed ahead Saturday with a purge of judicial officials, with 2,745 judges being dismissed across Turkey for alleged ties to Gulen. Ten members of Turkey's highest administrative court were detained and arrest warrants were issued for 48 administrative court members and 140 members of Turkey's appeals court, state media reported.

    The coup attempt began late Friday, with a military statement saying forces had seized control "to reinstall the constitutional order, democracy, human rights and freedoms, to ensure that the rule of law once again reigns in the country, for law and order to be reinstated."

    Fighter jets buzzed overhead, gunfire erupted outside military headquarters and vehicles blocked two major bridges in Istanbul. Soldiers backed by tanks blocked entry to Istanbul's airport for a couple of hours before being overtaken by pro-government crowds carrying Turkish flags, according to footage broadcast by the Dogan news agency.

    The military did not appear unified, as top commanders went on television to condemn the action and order troops back to their barracks.

    Erdogan, appearing on television over a mobile phone, had urged supporters into the streets to defend his government, and large crowds heeded his call. People faced off against troops who had blocked key bridges over the Bosporus that link the Asian and European sides of Istanbul.

    By early Saturday, the putsch appeared to have fizzled, as police, soldiers and civilians loyal to the government confronted coup plotters.

    In images broadcast on CNN-Turk, dozens of soldiers walked among tanks with their hands held up, surrendering to government forces. Discarded gear was strewn on the ground. Some flag-waving people climbed onto the tanks.

    NTV television showed a Turkish colonel and other soldiers on their knees being searched and taken into custody at military headquarters. The Hurriyet newspaper, quoting investigators, said some privates told them they were not even aware they were part of a coup attempt but thought they were on military maneuvers.

    Colonels and generals implicated in the rebellion were fired and loyal troops rescued the military chief who had been taken hostage at an air base on the outskirts of Ankara, the capital.

    A Blackhawk military helicopter with seven Turkish military personnel and one civilian landed in the Greek city of Alexandroupolis, where the passengers requested asylum, according to Greece's defense ministry. While Turkey demanded their extradition, Greece said it would hand back the helicopter and consider the men's asylum requests.

    Fighting continued into the early morning, with the sounds of huge blasts echoing across Istanbul and Ankara, including at least one bomb that hit the parliament complex. Television footage showed broken glass and other debris strewn across a lobby leading to the assembly hall.

    CNN-Turk said two bombs hit near the presidential palace, killing five people and wounding a number of others.

    Turkey is a key partner in U.S.-led efforts to defeat the Islamic State group, and has allowed American jets to use its Incirlik air base to fly missions against the extremists in nearby Syria and Iraq. A coup against the democratically elected government could have made it difficult for the United States to continue to cooperate with Turkey.

    Erdogan's Islamist government has also been accused of playing an ambiguous — even double-sided — role in Syria. Turkey's renewed offensive against Kurdish militants — who seek more autonomy and are implacable foes of IS — has complicated the U.S.-led fight against the Islamic State group.

    Fadi Hakura, a Turkey expert at the Chatham House think tank in London, said it was not clear who was behind the attempted coup, but it appeared to have been "carried out by lower-ranking officers — at the level of colonel."

    "Their main gripe seems to have been President Erdogan's attempt to transform his office into a powerful and centralized executive presidency," Hakura said. "I think in the short term this failed coup plot will strengthen President Erdogan, particularly in his drive to turn his office into a strong and centralized executive presidency."

    Turkey's military staged three coups between 1960 and 1980 and pressured Prime Minister Necmettin Erbakan, a pious Muslim mentor of Erdogan, out of power in 1997. - Yahoo News


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  • ‘Economy needs urgent fix, Nigerians are hungry’

    16/Jul/2016 // 529 Viewers

     

    A Niger Delta group, Urhobo Monitoring and Development Group, on Saturday called on President Muhammadu Buhari-led administration to fix the country’s ailing economy from sliding into total collapse.

    Prince Kingsley Oberuruaria, National President of UMDG, told journalists that Nigerians are hungry noting that the economy needs proactive measure to prevent it sliding into eminent ‘recession.’

    Oberuruaria stressed that there was nothing wrong for a government to wedge war against corruption but the same attention should also be accorded to the nation’s dying economy where the average Nigerian can hardly afford a meal per day at present.
     
    The group said it has observed that the APC-led federal government was not doing enough to tackle the economy which it reminded the government that hunger knows no political or religious affiliations.

    It also expressed reservation with the ongoing diversification into economy and other sectors saying that the Niger Delta region was being ignore in that directive.

    “Fighting corruption is good but the revival of the economy needs greater attention in this present time where the average Nigerian can barely afford a meal in the present circumstances. The truth is that Nigerians are hungry and you don’t need a soothsayer to know”, UMDG boss added.

    It added that effort to know what the government was doing so far to raise living standard of Niger Delta, it said, “We observed that the government diversification is mainly concentrated in the north, nothing so far in the south especially oil-rich Niger Delta.

    “The renewed militancy should not be excused for our exclusion. We have not heard anything about the revival of Delta Steel Company Aladja since President Buhari took over. Government needs to support the full take off of EPZ Ogidigbe. All these should be the palliatives to appeals the people of the region.”


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  • Breaking News: British MP, Jo Cox dead after attack near Leeds

    16/Jun/2016 // 887 Viewers

     

    PARIS, JUNE 16, 2016: (DGW) The death of a  British Member of Parliament Jo Cox who was shot by an  unknown gunman on Wednesday near Leeds. Cox reports say was attacked outside the meeting with constituents and died of her injuries shortly afterwards.

    However, police sources say they are only working on the assumption that it is a lone incident and a firearm has been  reportedly recovered from the scene of the incident but said they have not yet been  able to establish any motive behind the cold-blooded murder.

    She died after being shot and stabbed severally, police sources confirmed. Fellow lawmakers while condemning the dastardly act  said she enjoyed a good relationship with her colleagues in the parliament and wondered who could have risen to take her life.

    Meanwhile, the police have arrested a certain man at the scene of the incident who is presently undergoing interrogation, DailyGlobeWatch reliably gathered.

    Details shortly ..

     


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  • Denmark the happiest country in the world, Burundi most miserable - 2016 World Happiness Report

    16/Mar/2016 // 246 Viewers

     

    New York (AFP) - Denmark, closely followed by Switzerland, is the happiest country in the world while crisis-torn Syria and Burundi are the most miserable, according to a global ranking released Wednesday.

     

    The 2016 World Happiness Report seeks to quantify happiness as a means of making societies healthier and more efficient. The United Nations published the first such study in 2012.

    As with last year, Iceland, Norway, Finland, Canada, Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and Sweden round out the top 10, making small or medium-sized countries in Western Europe seven of the top 10 happiest countries.

    Denmark, which was ranked first in the 2013 version of the report but lost that honor to Switzerland in 2015, now reclaims its title as happiest country on Earth.

    Burundi was the most miserable, followed by war-ravaged Syria, Togo, Afghanistan and six other countries in sub-Saharan Africa -- Benin, Rwanda, Guinea, Liberia, Tanzania and Madagascar as the least happy of 157 countries.

    The report compared data from 2005 to 2015 showing that Greece, which suffered enormously from the global recession and now faces a crippling migrant crisis, had the highest drop in happiness.

    The United States, where sharp polarization has been exposed in the 2016 presidential election campaign, out-ranked several Western European countries to be 13th most happy nation, up two spots from last year.

    Germany was 16th, Britain 23rd and France 32nd. A string of Middle Eastern kingdoms -- Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait and Bahrain -- out-ranked Italy, which came in at number 50, and Japan, which took the 53rd spot.

    China, the world's most populous country, was ranked 83rd and India, the world's largest democracy, came in at 118.

    The authors said six factors -- GDP per capita, social support, healthy life expectancy, social freedom, generosity and absence of corruption -- explain almost three-quarters of the variation across different countries.

    The report compared levels of happiness in 2005-2007, before the onset of the global recession, with 2013-2015, the most recent three-year period for which data from a Gallup World Poll is available.

    Of the 126 countries for which comparable data was available, 55 had significant increases in happiness and 45 had significant decreases, the report found.

    Among the top 20 gainers were Thailand and China, eight countries in the Commonwealth of Independent States and Eastern Europe, seven in Latin America, two in sub-Saharan Africa and Macedonia in the Balkans.

    The 20 largest losers of happiness included Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Yemen and Saudi Arabia in the Middle East; Japan and India in Asia; and Cyprus, Spain, Italy and Greece in Europe -- all hard hit by the economic crisis.

    Ukraine, where the east has been roiled by a pro-Russian insurgency since 2014, has also fallen into the group of 10 largest happiness declines.

    Iceland and Ireland offer the best examples of maintaining happiness in the face of economic crisis due to high degrees of social support, the report found.


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  • ICC to investigate Russia-Georgia war

    16/Oct/2015 // 117 Viewers

    The prosecutor for the world’s only permanent war crimes court Tuesday formally requested to open the tribunal’s first inquiry into alleged abuses by Russia, by probing its 2008 war with Georgia.

    In her request to a three-judge panel, prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said a preliminary investigation had found evidence of alleged war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by Russian, Georgian and pro-Russian South Ossetian forces during the brutal, but swift, 2008 conflict.

    Bensouda asked for permission to open an investigation into allegations of abuses from 1 July to 10 October 2008.

    The initial inquiry had found “killings, forcible displacements and persecution of ethnic Georgian civilians, and destruction and pillaging of their property, by South Ossetian forces,” Bensouda said.

    There were also “attacks against Georgian peacekeepers by South Ossetian forces; and against Russian peacekeepers by Georgian forces”.

    On the night of August 7-8, 2008, Georgia’s then Western-backed president Mikheil Saakashvili launched an offensive to reclaim the breakaway region of South Ossetia only to see Russian forces sweep into Georgia instead.

    After winning the brief war, Russia officially recognised South Ossetia—along with another breakaway Georgian region Abkhazia—as independent states. Together the two regions comprise some 20 percent of Georgian territory.

     http://jobrize.com/index.php?ref=373503

     

    ICC prosecutors estimate some 13,400 and 18,500 ethnic Georgians were forcibly displaced and “that the ethnic Georgian population living in the conflict zone was reduced by at least 75 percent.”

    Bensouda said that pro-Russian South Ossetian separatist forces had carried out alleged crimes with “particular cruelty and on discriminatory grounds.”

    Some 5,000 homes were destroyed, between 51 and 113 ethnic Georgians killed and “victims were typically intimidated and humiliated, and forced to watch their homes being razed to the ground,” Bensouda wrote in her filing to the court.

    More than 24 villages in the Kurta, Tighva and Eredvi municipalities in South Ossetia were reportedly entirely or partly destroyed in order to forcible expel ethnic Georgians, she said.

    The preliminary investigation has also been examining the alleged killing of 10 Russian peacekeepers by Georgian forces.

    Established in 2002 as the world’s only permanent independent body to try war crimes, the Hague-based ICC has opened investigations in eight countries, all in Africa.

    Georgia is a state party to the founding Rome Statute of the ICC, which therefore has jurisdiction over crimes committed on its territory. Russia is not a signatory to the court.

    (AFP)
     


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  • UK refuses to grant Assange safe passage for medical check

    16/Oct/2015 // 120 Viewers

    Britain has refused Ecuador’s request to give Julian Assange safe passage for a medical check-up after he had a sharp pain in his right shoulder, Quito’s top diplomat said on Wednesday.

    The WikiLeaks founder has been holed up in the Ecuadoran embassy in London since 2012, seeking to avoid extradition to Sweden.

    Swedish prosecutors want to question Assange about a rape claim, which carries a 10-year statute of limitations that expires in 2020.

    Assange, who faces arrest if he tries to leave the embassy, denies the allegation and insists the sexual encounter was consensual.

    “We did ask the British government for a safe passage for humanitarian reasons in coordination with Ecuador, so that Julian Assange can get an MRI,” Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino told a briefing in Quito.

    “The reply we have had from Britain is that he can leave whenever he likes for any medical care he might need but the European arrest warrant for Assange is still valid. In other words, he can leave—and we will put him in jail,” Patino added.

     http://jobrize.com/index.php?ref=373503

     

    Patino spoke two days after Britain said it would stop standing guard non-stop outside the Ecuadoran embassy in London.

    The 44-year-old Australian also fears that if he leaves he could eventually face extradition to the United States and a trial over the leak of hundreds of thousands of classified military and diplomatic documents in 2010.

    Patino earlier said that “the British police have no reason to spend so much money to deploy so many police and vehicles outside the embassy.”

    He recalled that Sweden and Ecuador are negotiating what he called an international criminal assistance accord.

    Sweden wants this accord finished by the end of the year so it can question Assange inside the Ecuadoran embassy in London.

    Patino said no deadline for the agreement has been set.

    (AFP)

     


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  • Strauss-Kahn target of lawsuit over failed business venture

    16/Oct/2015 // 152 Viewers

    Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the scandal-plagued former head of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), is once again at the centre of a legal battle, French media revealed on Friday.

    Strauss-Kahn is under preliminary investigation over allegations of “fraud” and “misuse of company assets” at the now-defunct investment firm Leyne Strauss-Kahn Partners (LSK).

    Two former LSK shareholders have filed lawsuits against the company’s managers, including Strauss-Kahn, alleging that they lied about the financial state of the Luxembourg-based business.

    Strauss-Kahn became a board member of LSK in October 2013 and temporarily became the firm’s president before stepping down from the post one year later.

    LSK declared bankruptcy in November 2014, a few weeks after founder Thierry Leyne committed suicide in Tel Aviv.

    Strauss-Kahn’s lawyer told France Inter radio on Friday that his client “never had operational responsibilities” within the company, and that Strauss-Kahn’s signature had been forged on the minutes from several board meetings he had not attended.

    The former IMF chief has faced a series of legal charges since 2011, but has thus far avoided conviction. A French court in June acquitted him of procuring prostitutes for sex parties in France, Belgium and the United States.

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  • France ‘won’t hesitate’ to restore border controls for migrants

    16/Sep/2015 // 171 Viewers

     AFP / Stephane De Sakutin | French Prime Minister Manuel Valls gestures as he gives a speech during a debate on the migrant situation at the National Assembly in Paris on September 16, 2015.

    France will "not hesitate" to follow Germany in restoring border controls to stem an influx of refugees, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said Wednesday as he addressed a noticeably empty French parliament ahead of a debate on the migrant crisis.

    "We already restored temporary controls in spring (on the Italian border) and we won't hesitate to do it again as the rules of Schengen allow when circumstances require it," Valls told the French parliament.

    Buckling under the pressure of the worst refugee crisis in Europe since World War II, Germany announced this week it was reinstating border controls in a blow to the EU's passport-free Schengen zone.

    Austria and Slovakia quickly followed suit with similar measures and Poland said it was also willing to step up policing of its borders.

    Paris reinstated controls on its border with Italy in June as large numbers of migrants arriving by boat in Italy tried to cross into France.

    Valls also announced the creation of 900 extra security forces jobs, particularly border police, to fight illegal immigration.

    VALLS TRIES TO SHOW FRANCE 'BOTH GENEROUS AND TOUGH' ON MIGRANTS

    The French Socialist government has been under pressure from some on the political right to take a tougher stance towards the refugee crisis unfolding in Europe. But Valls also sought to reaffirm France’s commitment to helping refugees seeking asylum in the country.

    “The right to asylum is a fundamental right that is part of our history,” he said.

    “It is France's duty to welcome those people who are persecuted for their ideas or exposed to risk through their own integrity. The French government will never call this right into question.”

    'Refugees dying on our doorstep'

    Valls criticised a number of French mayors, many from the centre-right opposition party Les Républicains, who have in recent weeks voiced their opposition to taking in refugees in their towns, with some saying they would only welcome Christians.

    The Prime Minister also rejected Les Républicains leader Nicolas Sarkozy’s suggestion of only temporarily welcoming war refugees, with the goal of sending them back to their country of origin once conflict there ceased.

    President François Hollande has said France will take in 24,000 refugees over the next two years and warned that without a united EU policy to share the burden of migrants, the borderless Schengen system will collapse.

    Valls said that more than 600 million euros ($677 million) would go towards financing the reception of these refugees by the end of 2017.

    "Some tell us 'you must shut everything'. To say that is to ignore the refugees dying on our doorstep. Others say 'open everything'. To say that is to ignore the realities and difficulties faced by French society," said Valls.

    Following Valls's address, the French parliament was due to debate the migrant crisis facing Europe, though it was clear by the number of empty seats in the National Assembly that the majority of MPs had opted to stay away.


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  • Aid groups condemn Hungary’s ‘alarming’ migrant crackdown

    16/Sep/2015 // 180 Viewers

    AFP / Elvis Barukcic | Migrants and refugees walk near razor-wire along a 3-metre-high fence at the official border crossing between Serbia and Hungary, near the northern Serbian town of Horgos on September 15, 2015

    Aid groups on Tuesday condemned Hungary’s crackdown on migrants attempting to cross into the country through its border with Serbia, warning that its approach could have a damaging knock-on effect across Europe.

    Hungary effectively sealed its southern border with Serbia – a key land route for migrants and refugees attempting to reach the EU – by sealing a gap in a razor-wire barrier on Tuesday as well as closing two official border checkpoints.

    The country also enacted tough new anti-migrant legislation, including making “illegal border-crossing" a crime punishable by several years in prison.

    Hungary has said the measures are necessary to stem the tide of migrants and refugees arriving in the EU nation in recent months. But a number of aid groups and refugee agencies have been alarmed by the increasingly tough approach the country’s right-wing government is taking to tackling the migrant crisis facing Europe.

    Aurélie Ponthieu, humanitarian adviser for Doctors Without Borders, warned the move to close the border with Serbia could lead to chaos in other countries, particularly at Greece’s border with Macedonia, if other European states follow Hungary’s example in a “domino effect”.

    Macedonian border guards were overwhelmed last month when hundreds of migrants forced their way across from Greece.

    Ponthieu said MSF is calling “urgently for safe and legal channels to be created” so that people can cross Europe without putting their lives at risk.

    The United Nations refugee agency, the UNHCR, meanwhile, said Hungary’s actions could limit the rights of those seeking asylum.

    “We recognise the right of each country to protect its borders with the tools and methods it deems necessary,” UNHCR spokesman Erno Simon said.

    However, he added it was “very important” that no barriers are imposed on people fleeing war and persecution.

    Speaking to Reuters, Simon said Hungary’s new migrant legislation in particular was “really alarming”.

    Hungarian police said they arrested 174 people for breaching the fence on Tuesday, saying they would face criminal prosecution.

    Asylum claims rejected

    Simon said that migrants who had filed for asylum at the border with Serbia had seen their claims rejected in a matter of hours – a “very small period of time" for such complex cases.

    Hungarian authorities said they had processed 16 asylum requests Tuesday, all of which had been rejected.

    Amnesty International has said Hungary is "showing the ugly face of Europe's shambolic response" to the migration crisis, while the International Organization for Migration said the crackdown looks like a contravention of Hungary's obligations under UN and EU rules.

    But despite international criticism, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, one of Europe's most vociferous opponents of immigration, has showed no signs of backing down and the country's Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto said Tuesday the country is now also planning to erect a fence along its border with Romania.

    “The measure is necessary as people-smugglers may change their routes because of the existing fence on the Hungary-Serbia border, hence a part of the immigration pressure may get directed towards Romania," he said, according to state news agency MTI

    Romania criticised the announcement, branding it "out of step with the spirit of Europe".

    At least 200,000 migrants have crossed into Hungary so far this year, streaming north through the Balkan peninsula having hit Greek shores by boat or dinghy from Turkey.

    Reuters


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